NPFI supports the development of sustainable and scalable open source software for humanitarian non-profit organizations using an agile approach. The following successful projects show the viability and power of this approach.

  • BMAC-Warehouse – Blue Mountain Action Council, Walla Walla, WA (2015): Students developed software that supports the management of a non-profit’s food bank inventory, receipts, and shipments.
  • DONATE – Manchester, NH (2012): Students developed a tool that could allow the YWCA, New Hampshire to add, update, edit, and delete donation information, to track who makes donations, donation amounts, and fund raising events.
  • Homebase – Ronald McDonald House Charities of Maine (2008-): Students developed software that provides online volunteer and calendar information, and a user interface that allows the non-profit to schedule volunteers into shifts with a simple online action.
  • Homebase – Ronald McDonald House, Providence, RI (2015): Students reworked the Homebase software to support volunteer scheduling for a client with different requirements, again replacing a paper-based system.
  • Homecheck – People Plus, Brunswick, ME (2011): Students developed software to support volunteer and participant scheduling and recordkeeping for the “Good Morning” program, a daily call-in program where participants call in each morning to confirm their well-being.
  • Homeplate – Second Helpings, Beaufort County, SC (2012): Students developed software that allows volunteers to easily electronically record food donation pick-ups and drop-offs, and allows the non-profit to easily generate donation reports.
  • Homeroom – Ronald McDonald House, Portland, ME (2011-): Students developed software that allows the non-profit to electronically record overnight room reservations for its clients, replacing a paper-based system.
  • Homeroom – Ronald McDonald House, Manhattan, NY (2012-): Students redeveloped the Homeroom software to fit the needs of a client with more extensive requirements, again replacing a paper-based system.
  • Kent Serves Web Site – Kent Community Services, Kent, WA (2016): Students developed a database and web site that unifies the services of all the non-profit organizations in the area.
  • Mobile Apps for Local Government – Hartford, CT (2013-): Students developed mobile applications for Hartford’s City Departments and local nonprofit provider agencies. In this project, Trinity College instructors worked with local high school students in collaboration with the Connecticut Chapter of the Computer Science Teachers Association to develop apps for the City of Hartford, Connecticut.